I have just learnt how to make Oha soup and so I thought I would share with you guys what I did. Of course, there are many variations of Oha or Ora soup on the internet and people make things differently, so do leave a comment to share your own special twist.

Pressure cooking meat

I could not get hold of fresh cocoyam on the day, so I used the powdered version which is of course easier – no boiling and then mashing ahead of being used as a thickener. In my opinion, it worked just as well as the original thing. You will see from the recipe below that I used both achi and cocoyam, rather than just one or the other.

Uziza and oha leaf

The most exciting thing for me about this soup was the ogiri paste, which I have never played with before. It is basically fermented oil or locust bean (a bit like iru). It stank, but in the most intriguing and delightful way. It was somewhere in the middle of smoky, metallic and pungent. My nose got all twitchy and alert and I know now that I am going to have to get some more to experiment with. When you put it in the soup, it gives off the most distinctive scent. If you ever wonder what gives Oha soup its signature smell, this is it! Kitchen Butterfly has an excellent write-up about fermented seeds and things over here.

Ogiri-igbo

 

Even before the leaves were added to the pot, I thought the colours were gorgeous. Such vigorous oranges and reds. I tasted it so many times at this stage. I couldn’t get enough of that stinky metallic goodness. And of course I had to sample a few bit of dry fish as well, just to see how they were soaking up all the flavour.

Oha soup in progress

You are probably wondering about my Garri Paprika Rolls and you’re thinking ‘ehen, Minjiba has come again oh.’ Well yes, I have really come again. I believe that one should be able to eat garri and soup without feeling as though one has swallowed a goat whole. We eat too much starch and not enough of the soup.

You are probably wondering about my Garri Paprika Rolls and you're thinking 'ehen, Minjiba has come again oh.' Well yes, I have really come again. I believe that one should be able to eat garri and soup without feeling as though one has swallowed a goat whole. We eat too much starch and not enough of the soup.

It is so much healthier to eat lots of green, veggie-rich soup and very little or no swallow. So in honour of that, I wanted to make the garri look ornamental, as an artistic reminder of the sort of proportions that we should adhere to. And also because heck, why can’t garri look pretty? I am all about redefining Nigerian food, and so today, we upgrade our humble garri mound into roulade status. Yes sir!

Oha Soup with Garri Paprika Rolls Omnomlagos

Anyway, here you are. Enjoy! x

Omnomlagos Oha soup with Garri Paprika Rolls
Oha Soup with Garri Paprika Rolls
Print Recipe
Oha soup is an eastern Nigerian classic. It is a leafy soup which combines oha and uziza leaves, and the distinctive smoky flavour of fermented oil beans. It generally eaten with garri, pounded yam or fufu.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 minutes 20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 minutes 20 minutes
Omnomlagos Oha soup with Garri Paprika Rolls
Oha Soup with Garri Paprika Rolls
Print Recipe
Oha soup is an eastern Nigerian classic. It is a leafy soup which combines oha and uziza leaves, and the distinctive smoky flavour of fermented oil beans. It generally eaten with garri, pounded yam or fufu.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 minutes 20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 30 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
90 minutes 20 minutes
Ingredients
  • 2 kg beef
  • 3 chunks stock fish
  • 1 dry fish
  • 1 tbsp ogiri paste similar to iru or locust bean
  • 2 tbsp cocoyam powder mixed with 100ml water
  • 1 tbsp achi mixed with 50ml water
  • 3 handfuls oha leaf roughly torn up by hand
  • 2 handfuls uziza leaf thinly sliced
  • 3 cooking spoons palm oil
  • salt to taste
  • 4 - 6 stock cubes
  • powdered cayene pepper to taste
  • 3 tbsp powdered crayfish
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Place the beef, stock fish, four stock cubes, salt and pepper in a pressure cooker and cook for about 45 minutes or until tender.
  2. Transfer to a large soup pot - preferably a beat up looking local one that will show your soup some local and authentic love.
  3. Let the simmering get into a nice rhythm, and then add the dry fish, the crayfish and the palm oil.
  4. Add the achi and the ogiri. Stir, taste, and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Let this cook for a bit.
  5. Time to add the sliced uziza leaves. Let them cook for a bit.
  6. Add the torn oha leaves. Stir and allow the leaves to soften.
  7. Take off the heat and enjoy.
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe